Value the Experience

When we’re up in the mountains, exploring trails, or photographing friends, it’s a little too easy to get so wrapped up in our cameras that we miss out on the actual experience.

Just like in life as a whole, the experience is more important than the tangible, like a photo print or money from a client.

Who cares if our photographs represent where we’ve been when we were too busy messing around with our cameras to actually enjoy the experience and have something to remember?

 

Whether we’re out on a hike and brought our gear along, or we’re out specifically for a client, let’s remember to slow down, and actually ENJOY the experience.

Let’s make beautiful memories, not just beautiful images~

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

 

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

See you next week!

Calm Night Sky | Before and After Editing

The edited astrophotography image compared to the original, out of camera shot.

Definitely wanted to focus on a blue sky and bright clouds in this capture, so color and luminosity were the main adjustments, in addition to a tilt/crop and some clone stamping to remove distracting elements.

Often it’s best to do the final crop/frame in-camera, but with a wide-angle lens, it can be hard!

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

See you next week!

Sketch Ideas | Planning a Photoshoot

We don’t always need to have a concrete idea of what we’re planning for our model and set when going into a photoshoot, especially a casual one, but having at least a good idea is great for getting the creative ball rolling!

There should ideally be room to play when photographing a subject, especially since our original ideas don’t always work out!

 

This is where sketching comes in!

Even a simple stick figure with notes gets the creative juices flowing, and the more ideas we put to paper, the more we’ll have to play with in the photography studio and the more fleshed out these ideas will be!

We’ll also get a clue as to whether our ideas will actually work!

Wish sketching, we can visualize different lighting, costumes, hair design, backgrounds, set, posing, and crop!

 

Planning ahead isn’t something I usually do myself, but it’s definitely something I’m trying to get better at!

The more we plan, the easier it is to infuse meaning into our work, and have a variety of options for a more successful shoot!

 

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!
See you next week!

DIY Basic Portrait Backdrop

Backdrops made for photography, whether paper or muslin, can get really pricey!

It’s easy to get caught up in brands and gear and think we need to spend major money on professional backgrounds, but we really don’t!

 

Backdrops can be as simple as a painted or white wall, thrifted wallpaper, wrapping paper, and even thrifted curtains, sheets, and blankets!

Most of the time, my go-to backdrop is a spare black blanket.  It’s easily tacked to the wall and looks great.

When sourcing fabrics, thicker, polyester blends tend to look best, as they won’t be translucent and don’t wrinkle as easily as cotton!

We can even make DIY, custom photography backdrops by painting on the fabric.

 

By using thrifted blankets and curtains, wallpaper, and wrapping paper, we can get detailed, versatile backdrops for our portraits for just a couple of dollars!

Let’s remember that we don’t always need the ‘pro’ gear.  DIY is often not only cheaper, but better!

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

 

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

Dark fantasy portrait

gothic fashion self portrait photography

Color Management | Goals and Purpose

In Editing: Getting Accurate Color and Brightness, we touched on monitor calibration.

Color management is a topic that’s a bit complex and can be confusing, but let’s take another step!

 

Once we’ve calibrated our monitors and have a good editing setup, we open up a photograph to edit, and need to decide what Color Proof we’re going to work with.

This can be found in Photoshop CS5 under View>Proof Setup>Custom.

Popular working options include Internet Standard RGB, Adobe, and more.

Depending on which Proof option we choose (and be sure that ‘Proof Colors’ is checked!), our image can look VERY different.

 

This is where our goals and purpose comes in.

  • If we only plan to upload our photography online, working in Internet Standard RGB may be best.
  • If we plan on running prints of our fine art for sale, working in CMYK or a custom profile via our preferred printer may be best.

It really depends on what our main use of our art will be.

 

Color Management is a very important, although complex, topic.

Let’s check out some of the articles available online, and get a better idea of how we’re working!

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

 

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

See you next week!

Sunset Tower | Before & After Editing

Original OOC (out of camera) image versus the final, edited photograph below.

Sometimes editing is a bit more subtle, but how ever long we edit, let’s keep our intention in mind.

How we edit our photography depends on the mood we’re going for, the story we want to tell, and the purpose behind our chosen technique.

Let’s remember to keep our intentions in mind!

 

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

 

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Photography before and after

Before and after editing of a fine art landscape photograph of a woodland path.

Choose a Lens That Meets Personal Needs and Goals

It seems like common sense, but choosing the right camera gear for our photography can get a little difficult, whether we’re just starting out or more experienced.

It’s easy to get caught up with what we see online and what other photographers can’t stop talking about.

 

Knowing our current gear, and our needs, preferences, and shooting goals is a must!

An 11mm f/2.8 lens used for astro photography isn’t going to give us the same look as an 80mm f/1.8 portrait lens.

 

That doesn’t mean we can’t experiment and mix it up, but getting to know our photography equipment and what’s available can help us make better buying choices!

So far, f/stop, speed, wide angle vs telephoto, and manual vs automatic focus are the aspects to focus on!

When we know our current gear and what isn’t working for us, we can hit the photography books and forums to see what kind of lenses other photographers are using that will meet our needs, preferences, and goals!

And when it comes to investing in new gear, let’s not overlook renting or buying used!

 

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!
See you next week!

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’