Black Swan | Portrait Editing Stages

A few stages broken down from editing Black Swan.

As we work, let’s remember to save frequently, and save layered files as ‘stages’ before we compress an image and continue on!

It’ll save us some headaches if we need or want to revisit and reedit an earlier stage.

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

Photography edit before and after

Gothic Wallflower | Before and After

The before and after editing Gothic Wallflower.

Another example of how sometimes the magic lies in the editing process.

The ring light was used as the key light, and an off-camera flash with a red (diy) gel stood off to the right.  The gelled flash was a bit too far forward, and therefore cast red over more of the face than hoped for.

The lighting and red cast was adjusted in PS, and still left a subtle ‘wrapped color’ that had been originally intended.

Let’s keep learning new techniques, practicing, failing, and trying again.

Although we should try to get the best image out of camera, let’s not be afraid to embrace editing to create magic.

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

Before and after editing a portrait fashion shoot
Photography before and after

Calm Night Sky | Before and After Editing

The edited astrophotography image compared to the original, out of camera shot.

Definitely wanted to focus on a blue sky and bright clouds in this capture, so color and luminosity were the main adjustments, in addition to a tilt/crop and some clone stamping to remove distracting elements.

Often it’s best to do the final crop/frame in-camera, but with a wide-angle lens, it can be hard!

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

See you next week!

Sketch Ideas | Planning a Photoshoot

We don’t always need to have a concrete idea of what we’re planning for our model and set when going into a photoshoot, especially a casual one, but having at least a good idea is great for getting the creative ball rolling!

There should ideally be room to play when photographing a subject, especially since our original ideas don’t always work out!

 

This is where sketching comes in!

Even a simple stick figure with notes gets the creative juices flowing, and the more ideas we put to paper, the more we’ll have to play with in the photography studio and the more fleshed out these ideas will be!

We’ll also get a clue as to whether our ideas will actually work!

Wish sketching, we can visualize different lighting, costumes, hair design, backgrounds, set, posing, and crop!

 

Planning ahead isn’t something I usually do myself, but it’s definitely something I’m trying to get better at!

The more we plan, the easier it is to infuse meaning into our work, and have a variety of options for a more successful shoot!

 

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!
See you next week!

Continue to Learn

As with any practice and art, photography requires a commitment to learning.

We will never grow and improve if we’re not willing to keep learning, exploring, and pushing ourselves.

It’s simple, but easy to forget and get complacent.

Continue to learn.

Let’s set ourselves a goal to learn and practice something new every week.

Find a new lighting setup to try, learn about color management, find out what’s up with that ‘histogram’ thing, or get back to basics with color theory and design.

Continuing to learn and practice new things is one of the best ways to guarantee that we won’t grow bored and depressed, and that our art won’t become stagnant carbon copies.

Let’s write down a list of things we’d like to learn about, have avoided learning, and keywords we want to research.  And let’s cross something new off this list each week!

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’!

 

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

See you next week!

Editing: Build on Layers

When it comes to editing photography, it’s common sense to work on multiple layers, but don’t be afraid to use even more layers when editing specific elements.

If you’re using curve adjustment layers to manipulate brightness and contrast, you don’t have to ‘get it right’ in one layer.  Keep building, make several passes!

You can do the same to build on colors.

If we’re stuck on one layer trying to ‘perfect’ an adjustment, let’s just leave it where it is, and create a new layer on top to build on it!

Add on layer masks, and we can get more control to fine-tune our work!

Keep layers named and organized into groups, or you can save your work in stages, flatten all layers, and keep building from there

 

Let’s not shy away from adding ‘too many’ layers, and taking the time to get it right!

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

 

Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, let’s start off with some basics to get started with photography!
If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

See you next week!

Improve Our Photography by Changing Our Shooting Height

Changing the height we shoot at is a simple trick that can greatly improve our photography.

It’s easy to go around shooting at our eye level, but this can result is images that look a bit flat.  There’s wiggle room and no set ‘rules’, but here are some general tips!

  • When photographing a portrait, shoot at the model’s eye-level to minimize distortion.
  • Alternatively, if shooting a full-body fashion portrait, shoot a bit lower, around the model’s waist-level, as this will stretch their legs and make them look taller!
  • When photographing landscapes, get low to the ground!  The lower we can get, the better.  A shot taken when we’re laying in the mud often looks much more dynamic than one taken while standing up!  Plus, the added foreground elements add space and dimension!

These rules of thumb basically bank on the fact that what’s closest to the camera looks bigger and is empathized.

If you want someone to look tall and powerful, shoot below eye-level, if you want them to look vulnerable, shoot above eye-level.  And when it comes to landscapes, lower is often better!

 

These are some simple tricks to improve your photography, as dynamic images are about how we use our equipment, not on what equipment we’re using! (relatively)

Let’s mix it up, change our position, and see how something as simple as kneeling down can improve our art!

Much Peace and Keep Roamin’

 

If you have any questions or suggestions for Tips, Tricks, and Tutorials Tuesday, please leave a comment or contact me!

See you next week!